Native Wildlife Rescue | Wildlife rescue and rehab in Fauquier, Rappahannock, and Culpeper counties Virginia
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About us

Our team was established by a group of volunteer rehabilitators to better serve the public and aid wildlife. All of our members have received legal permits from the Federal Government and the Commonwealth of Virginia which allow us to work with wildlife. We have been specifically trained to handle sick, injured, and orphaned wildlife. Each year we care for hundreds of birds, reptiles, and mammals who are in need of our assistance. Many of these animals require extensive care before they may be released back into their natural habitats.

Many people understandably mistake when an animal truly needs rescuing.
In order to prevent this, please read over these helpful guidelines.
1. Please do not interfere with wildlife unless:
  • There is obvious injury
  • They are too young to care for themselves—a baby is too young to care for itself if its eyes are closed, it is not fully feathered or furred, or if it is not yet mobile
  • They are in immediate danger
2. Double check to be certain that the animal needs rescuing:
  • Watch and wait quietly from a distance to make sure babies are truly orphaned—many species (deer, rabbits, birds) will leave their offspring alone for extended periods of time, but this does not mean the baby has been abandoned
  • Baby birds are often mistaken for being abandoned, but if it has feathers, is hopping around, and speaking, then it is fine and can be left alone
3. When you do find an animal that needs rescuing:
  • Please place it in small box that has been lined with a soft towel, shirt, or even tissue paper
  • Please DO NOT give it any food or water—often times animals are fed something they would not naturally eat and this can cause them even more harm
  • Keep the animal in a warm, quiet place until you can get it to a legal rehabilitator

Please keep in mind that it is illegal to keep wildlife unless you have acquired the proper permits to do so. It is not unusual for people to receive fines for unlawfully keeping wild creatures. We would hate for that to happen to anyone, especially to those who are simply trying to help. So please, if you find a wild animal, contact a qualified wildlife rehabilitator immediately.

Need help with a rescue?

Contact one of our rehabbers

Raptors (birds of prey)

Kent Knowles

703-578-1175

Raptor Conservatory of Virginia

Raccoons

Cal Dooley

540-878-1717

Amo Merritt

540-987-8431

Squirrels

Cal Dooley

540-878-1717

Rabbits

Cal Dooley

540-878-1717

Opossums

Judie Graham

540-825-6407

Songbirds

Amo Merritt

540-987-8431

Fawns

Cal Dooley

540-878-1717

Skunks

Cal Dooley

540-878-1717

Contact us

Native Wildlife Rescue Inc.

5438 Sperryville Pike, Boston, VA 22713

Cal Dooley

Raccoons, Squirrels, Rabbits, Songbirds, Fawns, Skunks

540-878-1717

Amo Merritt

Raccoons, Songbirds

540-987-8431

Judie Graham

Opossums

540-825-6407

Kent Knowles

Raptors (birds of prey)

703-578-1175

Raptor Conservatory of Virginia

Other contact information

Wildlife Center of Virginia

540-942-9453

Wildlife Rescue League Hotline

703-440-0800

www.dgif.virginia.gov

Where we rescue

Help support us

We are a volunteer organization and all of our services are free. Because of this, we gladly welcome donations.

 

Make a donation to the care of sick, injured, and orphaned wildlife. Please make checks payable to: Native Wildlife Rescue, Inc. and mail to: Native Wildlife Rescue, Inc. Amo Merritt, Treasurer 5438 Sperryville Pike Boston, VA 22713

How You Can Help Protect Wildlife

Many people wonder how they can help prevent the injuries and trauma of the animals we care for. House cats are responsible for more wildlife injuries than any other individual animal. In fact, nearly 30% of the cases we receive are the result of domesticated cats. Even when caring people bring us animals that have been attacked by cats, almost 80% of these animals will die. Cats are merely acting on their natural instincts and just like you, we love them dearly. However, we highly recommend that they remain indoors where they do not have the chance to harm the wildlife.

Other ways you can help:

  1. Provide safe, clean housing for animals such as birds and bats.
  2. Provide clean and full birdbaths and feeders.
  3. Do not use toxic and dangerous pesticides in your lawn or garden as these can seriously harm the environment
  4. Do not use poisons for rodent control—other animals may eat the carcasses and in turn poison themselves.
  5. Do not use sticky mousetraps.
  6. Consider placing decals on large glass doors and windows to deter birds from flying into them.
  7. Block off openings to your chimney in order to keep wildlife out.
  8. Do not leave paint, tar, or other harmful substances uncovered or out in the open.
  9. Please do not move bird nests once eggs have been laid.
  10. Please teach your children and others to respect wildlife.
  11. Also, remember that wildlife should remain wild and are not suitable pets.